Exquisite French Ormolu and Pink Porcelain Clock Set after Francois Remond

$35,000.00

Exquisite French Ormolu Bronze and Pink Porcelain Three-Piece Clock Set Garniture after Francois Remond. The clock by Furet A Paris. Design of the case after Francois Rémond (c. 1747-1812) French chaser, engraver, founder and gilder. Dial inscribed ‘Furet à Paris’ Workshop Jean Baptiste André Furet (c. 1720-1807) The clock and candelabra are of very high jewel-like quality. Exquisite workmanship. Exceptional ormolu with mercury gilding. Clock: 13.5″ high x 19″ wide x 4″ deep Candelabra: 19″ high x 8.5″ wide x 3.5″ deep. Very good condition. Normal wear consistent with age and use. ***Jean Baptiste André Furet (c. 1720-1807) Born in Paris in 1720 as son of watchmaker Jean André Furet, Jean Baptiste André Furet became Master Clockmaker on 18th of November 1746. From 1746-49 he was employed at his father’s business, before he eventually continued the firm on his own. In 1759 Furet was appointed court watchmaker ‘Horloger Ordinaire du Roi pour sa Bibliothèque’. From 1784-85 he formed a partnership with Francois-Antoin Godon, during that time they signed their clocks ‘Furet & Godon’. Furet collaborated with numerous craftsmen, for example with different cabinetmakers, bronze casters, enamel specialist and chasers. His most famous work is the Pendule à la Négresse, which Marie-Antoinette bought and gave to her son the Dauphin of France in 1791. In 1786 Furet had financial problems and finally had to declare bankruptcy. Clocks by the famous master can today be seen at the Louvre and the Musée Jacquemart-André in Paris as well as at the Musée des Beaux Arts et d’Archéologie in Besançon. François Rémond (c. 1747 – 1812) was a French master metalworker and bronze gilder who achieved renown in his day, and whose work is still greatly valued. It included stand-alone works such as candelabras, the decorative casings for clocks and bronze ornamentation for the elaborate furniture made for the elite at the time. He worked with the bronze caster Pierre Gouthière on some of his larger works before 1788, when Gouthière went bankrupt.[1] Both Rémond and Gouthière were known for their ability to create matt and burnished gilding. They would make elaborate gilt-bronze mounts for clocks, furniture or statuary that incorporated imaginary or rare creatures such as camels and ostriches.[4] Rémond also made ornaments and figures for clock makers and furniture mounts for ébénistes.[1] He provided bronze ornamentation for the furniture-maker Jean Henri Riesener (1734-1806).[5]

Category: